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antimicrobial resistance computing meetings molecular dynamics

BioExcel Alchemical Free Energy workshop

Last month I was invited to give a talk on using alchemical free energy methods to predict antimicrobial resistance at a workshop in Göttingen organised by the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry on behalf of BioExcel. You can read more about the meeting, which I hope will become a biennial event, here.

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antimicrobial resistance clinical microbiology meetings tuberculosis

Twitter at #ECCMID

A bit over two years ago I was a guest blogger at the US Biophysical Society Annual Meeting in Baltimore. I was disappointed by the lack of Tweeting at the conference – there were 208 tweets using the #bps15 hashtag when I wrote a blog post in which I speculated that, one day, there might […]

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antimicrobial resistance citizen science meetings tuberculosis

Diagnosing antibiotic resistance: future trends?

It is Sunday, I’m in Vienna at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) congress. As is traditional at all large conventions, I’m sitting on the floor outside one of the halls because the organisers have put one of the most popular sessions (Gram-negative resistance) in one of the smallest rooms. A […]

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meetings molecular dynamics teaching

Analysing Simulation Data CECAM Workshop, Jülich, 14-15 October 2015

This two day workshop on Analysing Simulation Data was part of the larger CECAM Macromolecular Simulation Software Workshop at the Forschnungzentrum, Jülich that I co-organised. It was the second workshop and immediately followed an introductory Software Carpentry workshop. Prior to a few years ago I analysed all my simulation data using either VMD, often by […]

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computing meetings software carpentry teaching

Software Carpentry Workshop, Jülich, 12-13 October 2015

Last week, myself and David Dotson from ASU, ran a 2 day Software Carpentry workshop to kick off the CECAM Macromolecular Simulation Software Workshop at the Forschnungzentrum, Jülich. The idea was to give participants who were less well versed in python and working collaboratively with e.g. git a crash course to bring them up to […]

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computing meetings molecular dynamics software carpentry teaching

CECAM Macromolecular simulation software workshop

I’m co-organiser of this slightly-different CECAM workshop in October 2015 at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Rather than following the traditional format of 3-4 day populated by talks with the odd poster session, this is an extended workshop made up of six mini-workshops. Since it is focussed on python-based tools for biomolecular simulations, of which there are an increasing number, the […]

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computing meetings skills teaching

HackDay: Data on Acid

Every year the Software Sustainability Institute (SSI) run a brilliant meeting called the Collaborations Workshop, usually in Oxford. This is an unconference lasting two days. At first glance it doesn’t look like it would be relevant to my research, but I always learn something new, meet interesting people and start, well, collaborations. The latest edition was last […]

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meetings

BPS15: Yes! Yes! But why? But why?

As part of my series of guest blogs at the 59th Annual Meeting of the US Biophysical Society I wrote some thoughts on the National Lecture by Klaus Schulten that was last night. To find out what the quote refers to, you’ll have to follow this link… Update: you can now watch the National Lecture […]

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meetings

BPS15: Twitter and conferences: an ideal match or a nuisance?

I’m at the Annual Meeting of the US Biophysical Society Meeting in Baltimore which is large (6,500 scientists) with multiple parallel sessions. You might have thought that Twitter would be the ideal platform for providing a feed for all the questions, reactions and suggestions but very few people are using it, although there is definitely more tweeting compared to […]

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meetings

BPS15: Where shall we have lunch?

The most useful and enjoyable part of coming to the Annual Meeting for me is not the talks, nor is it the poster session nor even the free T-shirts. It is meeting up and talking with fellow scientists. But one must first solve an important question that Douglas Adams describes better than I ever could […]